Name

renice — alter priority of running processes

Synopsis

renice [−n] priority [−gpu] identifier...

DESCRIPTION

renice alters the scheduling priority of one or more running processes. The first argument is the priority value to be used. The other arguments are interpreted as process IDs (by default), process group IDs, user IDs, or user names. renice'ing a process group causes all processes in the process group to have their scheduling priority altered. renice'ing a user causes all processes owned by the user to have their scheduling priority altered.

OPTIONS

−n, −−priority priority

Specify the scheduling priority to be used for the process, process group, or user. Use of the option −n or −−priority is optional, but when used it must be the first argument.

−g, −−pgrp pgid...

Force the succeeding arguments to be interpreted as process group IDs.

−u, −−user name_or_uid...

Force the succeeding arguments to be interpreted as usernames or UIDs.

−p, −−pid pid...

Force the succeeding arguments to be interpreted as process IDs (the default).

−h, −−help

Display a help text.

−V, −−version

Display version information.

EXAMPLES

The following command would change the priority of the processes with PIDs 987 and 32, plus all processes owned by the users daemon and root:

renice +1 987 -u daemon root -p 32

NOTES

Users other than the super-user may only alter the priority of processes they own, and can only monotonically increase their ``nice value'' (for security reasons) within the range 0 to PRIO_MAX(20), unless a nice resource limit is set (Linux 2.6.12 and higher). The super-user may alter the priority of any process and set the priority to any value in the range PRIO_MIN(−20) to PRIO_MAX. Useful priorities are: 20 (the affected processes will run only when nothing else in the system wants to), 0 (the ``base'' scheduling priority), anything negative (to make things go very fast).

FILES

/etc/passwd

to map user names to user IDs

SEE ALSO

getpriority(2), setpriority(2)

BUGS

Non super-users can not increase scheduling priorities of their own processes, even if they were the ones that decreased the priorities in the first place.

The Linux kernel (at least version 2.0.0) and linux libc (at least version 5.2.18) does not agree entirely on what the specifics of the systemcall interface to set nice values is. Thus causes renice to report bogus previous nice values.

HISTORY

The renice command appeared in 4.0BSD.

AVAILABILITY

The renice command is part of the util-linux package and is available from Linux Kernel Archive


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    (#)renice.8   8.1 (Berkeley) 6/9/93